Title Format Primer – Part 1 – Dan Nguyen

Hey everyone! Dan here with another Title Format Article!

If you haven’t had a chance to try out the Title format for the Final Fantasy TCG yet, I definitely recommend giving it a shot. It can be a nice way to get use out of the cards you own that aren’t always relevant in the Standard meta game or let you relive some of that nostalgia of your favorite Final Fantasy games. This will be a multi-part primer of the positives and negatives of each Category in the FFTCG and includes my comments on how playable they are in the scope of the format (as of Opus 7). At the end of the day though, if a certain category brings you joy because it’s your favorite, by all means build it. While Title is not really balanced as much as Standard constructed is (this format is meant to be a fun and casual), it is great for side events and playing something wacky once in a while.

The Rules

  1. You can use cards from only one category, of course. One exception is that you can include the 1 CP Standard Unit Backups from each element.
  2. When you play cards, you can use any element for CP. For example, you can pitch fire forwards/summons to pay for earth forwards/summons. Abilities still require the correct CP.
  3. You can use more than 1 same name character at the same time, as long as they are different versions. For example, you can have on the board at the same time starter Rikku, heroic Rikku (backup) from Opus 1 and rare Rikku from Opus 6.
  4. Dissidia (DFF) and Jessie (4-082C) are currently the only cards that are banned. Unlike Standard, Thaumaturge and Gesper are not banned.

Here’s a scale that I’ll use to help rate the different categories. By no means is this the end all be all of Title. It should be understood that as new sets come out, the playability of each title will be adjusted. Rather the following remarks are my opinions on them (as of Opus 7) and hopefully they can help you decide on what title to focus on in the situation that you have not yet dabbled in this format.

Grading Scale

A – Top Tier, the strongest utility (summons, monsters, backups), synergy and strategy define the format

B – Above average, has decent utility, strong synergy

C – Average, some amount of utility and synergy

D – Below average, lacking utility, weak synergy

F – Not enough cards, unplayable

Final Fantasy I

Positives:

  • Light Warrior of Light (2-145L) has a ton of S effect fodder and gives (6-066H) and (7-131S) damage shields.

Negatives:

  • Has no summons; has no backups besides Chaos, and no monsters.
  • Some of the Warrior Light cards have Standard Unit synergy and this Category doesn’t have any Standard Unit forwards.
  • Garland (6-002L) has no Princesses and (4-005R) literally does nothing.
  • Not all Warrior of Light cards have the Warrior of Light Job.

Verdict:

Much like the first Final Fantasy game that started it all, the FFI category is pretty barebones and doesn’t have many characters. A lot of the Warrior of Light cards have the job Warrior and not Warrior of Light which is kind of unfortunate. There’s a huge lack of synergy, lack of utility as it has no backups, summons, or monsters. Unless you wanted to build this because FFI was your all-time favorite game, I would avoid building a deck for FFI.

Grade:

F

Final Fantasy II

Positives:

  • Normally having to rely on too many 1 CP backups would make a category feel pretty limited, but Cid (II) is excellent here. Like in standard he can fix your color and turn what would be 1 CP into 2 CP.
  • The Emperor (1-185H) has a TON of targets.
  • The Emperor (2-147L) is a powerful card that might shut down a lot of other categories that don’t have summons or powerful come into play effects.
  • Maria (1-083H) makes FFII a unique Category in that it has a passive +1000 buff that affects all your forwards. All the +1000 backups you use in standard like Lulu or Enna Kros are less effective in title since your forwards are usually a mishmash of different elements and all the +1000 backups are split amongst the different categories.
  • Rebel and FFII synergies are great.
  • Minwu (1-171H) is a really powerful backup in combat and for shutting down ping strategies. Only a handful of categories can actually break Minwu and even if they can they probably wouldn’t be used as often.

Negatives:

  • No summons. Your only removal cards are Black Knight and Firion (7-132S).

Verdict:

There’s a lot more to work with here with FFII when compared to FFI. You could build something around the Rebel synergies with Maria (6-057L), Guy (6-003H), and Firion (6-019L) and that seems pretty sweet.

Grade:

C+

Final Fantasy III

Positives:

  • You can try to build around Warrior of Lights or Standard Units, and maybe even some Onion Knight shenanigans.
  • Lots of options for backups.
  • Both Cloud of Darkness cards are strong.

Negatives:

  • Your only removal is 5cp Cloud of Darkness, Legendary and lightning Onion Knights, and a combination of some backups. While not unplayable, it’s not as effective as the removal from some of the other categories.
  • Warrior of Light synergy doesn’t really do much here. Your deck is most likely going to be a mishmash of elements, so it’ll be difficult to get any consistent use of their action abilities.
  • The Standard Unit strategy might be just as playable as the Warrior of Lights but the standard unit forwards you have access to aren’t all that exciting.

Verdict:

While not unplayable the FFIII category seems like the most barebones when compared to some of the popular categories like FFXII and FFTactics. Unless you’re a huge fan of Arc, Luneth, Ingus, and Refia, it’s not that great of a category.

Grade:

D

Final Fantasy IV

Positives:

  • There’s a few synergies you can build around: Palom/Porom, Archfiends, Cecil/Rosa,
  • Harley can make 3 of your backups cost 1 less.
  • You have access to Light Fusoya and both Tellahs.
  • Calbrena is difficult to remove for a lot of other categories.
  • 3cp Rydia is a good solution to sweep away a lot of the pesky aggressive decks in title like Type-Zero Cadets.

Negatives:

  • While they are useful, the summons FFIV has aren’t huge haymakers. Asura and Cockatrice are fine utility summons, but Leviathan is pretty conditional.

Verdict:

FFIV has a lot of avenues you can take in terms of how you want to build it, so really, it’s up to you if you want to do the Palom/Porom synergies or having all your Cecils backed up by your Rosas. I think out of these first 4, this category is the most exciting to try out.

Grade:

B+

Next time we’ll go over a few more categories in the game. A benefit of Title format is that the decks can be relatively inexpensive compared to Standard, so for all your Title needs, make sure to check out our sponsors at TCG Titans (https://tcgtitans.com/collections/final-fantasy-tcg-singles). Till next time!

- Dan Nguyen


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